Co-op News & Events

 

Events

 


September 21-23
Big 10 Owner Appreciation Discount Days

 

October 21
Annual Meeting 

 

 

 

Santa Monica & Culver City
Big 10 Owner Discount Days
May 17-19, 2019

 

 

Produce Notes: May 8, 2019

We’re continuing to see a turnaround in local organic produce availability on many of our favorites, and we’re in very good shape for Mother’s Day!

Local organic strawberries (Givens/Something Good) and blueberries are plentiful and currently at an amazing price at $3.99 each. Local lemons, plump sugar snap peas and asparagus are standouts and ready for your weekend brunch or dinner dishes.

Melons are here! Find organic mini seedless watermelons, as well as Honeydew and Harper melons - all from Mexico. Current Mexican availability means that local melons are not too far away. We'll bring them in as soon as available, and meeting our standards.

Because there's still some lag on local California spring crops, we’re hearing more and more questions and concerns from shoppers related to the higher than usual amount of Mexican organic fruits and veggies in our produce aisles. No, we haven’t changed our sourcing or standards. We always prefer local too, but we can’t pull what’s not available. During months when regional farms are inactive, but demand for an item is still high, we naturally turn to Mexico.

Unfortunately, there are many misconceptions about the safety and standards of organic Mexican grown produce. Organic imports from Mexico must meet USDA organic standards. To sell a certified organic item of food in the United States, grown in the United States, Mexico, or anywhere else in the world, it must meet all the strict requirements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Organic Program: produced without the use of toxic synthetic pesticides, artificial fertilizers, sewage sludge, genetically modified organisms, or irradiation. After meeting those standards, it must then be certified by a USDA-accredited agency which includes: 1) inspection of farm fields and processing facilities 2) detailed record keeping of what inputs were applied to the land, and 3) if determined a need for – soil and water testing. On-farm audits and regular border inspections are also important parts of organic certification and food safety testing process.

Mexico is estimated to have more than 110,000 organic farmers, with the majority growing for the export market out of necessity, as there is a lack of demand for domestic organics in Mexico. By importing food from Mexican growers who receive a living wage, particularly those who sell products recognized as Fair Trade, we're allowing farmers to remain in their own communities rather than leave home to find employment. It’s about far more than just having our favorite organic fruit and vegetables available during gap months. Organic food production in Mexico has been a very healthy development for farmers and the people of the Mexican farming communities. 


Produce Notes: May 8, 2019

We’re continuing to see a turnaround in local organic produce availability on many of our favorites, and we’re in very good shape for Mother’s Day!

Local organic strawberries (Givens/Something Good) and blueberries are plentiful and currently at an amazing price at $3.99 each. Local lemons, plump sugar snap peas and asparagus are standouts and ready for your weekend brunch or dinner dishes.

Melons are here! Find organic mini seedless watermelons, as well as Honeydew and Harper melons - all from Mexico. Current Mexican availability means that local melons are not too far away. We'll bring them in as soon as available, and meeting our standards.

Because there's still some lag on local California spring crops, we’re hearing more and more questions and concerns from shoppers related to the higher than usual amount of Mexican organic fruits and veggies in our produce aisles. No, we haven’t changed our sourcing or standards. We always prefer local too, but we can’t pull what’s not available. During months when regional farms are inactive, but demand for an item is still high, we naturally turn to Mexico.

Unfortunately, there are many misconceptions about the safety and standards of organic Mexican grown produce. Organic imports from Mexico must meet USDA organic standards. To sell a certified organic item of food in the United States, grown in the United States, Mexico, or anywhere else in the world, it must meet all the strict requirements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Organic Program: produced without the use of toxic synthetic pesticides, artificial fertilizers, sewage sludge, genetically modified organisms, or irradiation. After meeting those standards, it must then be certified by a USDA-accredited agency which includes: 1) inspection of farm fields and processing facilities 2) detailed record keeping of what inputs were applied to the land, and 3) if determined a need for – soil and water testing. On-farm audits and regular border inspections are also important parts of organic certification and food safety testing process.

Mexico is estimated to have more than 110,000 organic farmers, with the majority growing for the export market out of necessity, as there is a lack of demand for domestic organics in Mexico. By importing food from Mexican growers who receive a living wage, particularly those who sell products recognized as Fair Trade, we're allowing farmers to remain in their own communities rather than leave home to find employment. It’s about far more than just having our favorite organic fruit and vegetables available during gap months. Organic food production in Mexico has been a very healthy development for farmers and the people of the Mexican farming communities. 

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